Tuesday, October 30, 2012

scraping yogurt out of the plastic container while I pray for ecological justice in the wake of the storm

Ugghhhh... the bits and pieces of news from the Sandy Storm that we can cobble together from on-line sources is devastating. My prayers continue for all, especially for the hearts and souls of first-responders.

Here... well.... Red sky in the morning, sailors take warning....

Sunrise in Eagle Butte, over the utility poles I call "Calvary"

One day wanders in to the next, the cold settling in and encouraging some folks to enter alcohol and drug treatment centers --a way to get shelter for the winter. At least, that is the way some see it. And it is Church Bazaar weekend coming up --preparing for Christmas.

How'd that happen? Dang....

But today, it promises to be up in the 50s or 60s, so we will put plexi-glass up on the basement windows because they leak like a sieve --and I am confident that if we get any real snow this winter, the windows and their ledges just inches off the ground will become open invitations to whatever the outside may offer.

And with some shock, I realized I have been at work here for nine months... I kept thinking only seven... perhaps it is better here to count by the week or cycles of the moon as was done traditionally --the days add up too quickly.

At the last class for Lay Readers last week, I emphasized that our Tradition is grounded as an "earth" tradition --that we are regulated in prayer by the cycles of the sun and moon --that our great feast of Easter is determined by the spring equinox and full moon --that we pray as the sun rises or sets.... Too often here I have heard that Christianity is out of touch with natural things, that we need buildings to pray in, that sort of thing. Really? I think to myself....

And then I ponder the Great Storm Sandy, and its devastation... and I do wonder about our roads and buildings and structures so necessary in our modern lives.... Yes, we all need shelter --but, what if....? And then I dream of totally green low carbon impact living...

--which, of course, would mean no computers as they are now, to start with.... Built as they are with mineral rich polluting components by low-wage earners while lining the pockets of the ultra rich who keep getting richer and richer....

--which, of course, would mean doing without a whole bunch of other stuff too --like all the plastics etc.

Is there any hope for us, living on this planet as we do?

So, that too, is front and center in my prayers --pondering the size and power of the storm and global warming....

--and knowing, as I scrape the yogurt out of the plastic container, that in most instances in the super market I MUST participate in our ecological destruction --we are given no other choice.

And so I grieve. For the generations to come. It's not the "debt" that is going to kill them.... Or the planet.

At prayer this morning (from Luke 11 after verse 30)

[Jesus said] “No one after lighting a lamp puts it in a cellar, but on the lampstand so that those who enter may see the light.

Your eye is the lamp of your body. If your eye is healthy, your whole body is full of light; but if it is not healthy, your body is full of darkness.

Therefore consider whether the light in you is not darkness. If then your whole body is full of light, with no part of it in darkness, it will be as full of light as when a lamp gives you light with its rays.”

Light comes from within....

We must hope. We must work month by month, day by day, hour by hour, minute by minute.

In this, we have choice.

Always. All ways.

Thanks be to God.

And, now --distracted by the door bell ringing twice, I really must run over and make sure the guys setting up for the hot lunch know how to use the thermostat. They have been turning the furnace on and off at the source, wreaking havoc with the heating systems....

--dangit --well, at least we use natural gas and not fuel oil or something.....


5 comments:

PseudoPiskie said...

While watching and listening to the reports from Sandy, my thoughts keep returning to you. No electricity. No subway. No trains. Can't get to work. Minor problems. How would most New Yorkers survive in the day to day conditions you describe? Mother Nature tries to teach us what is really important but, like our Bible study class, we tend to forget between lessons.

it's margaret said...

PseudoPiskie --where we live there are few distractions from what is really important.

it's margaret said...

--which I consider to be really really wonderful --close to heaven!!!

Paula said...

After one storm that left us without power for a week, I became enthralled by the sheer silence in the house. I learned what was absolutely necessary to do, what rooms we actually use (and swept those), and rejoiced in the break from email and the computer. Deep lessons. I keep forgetting.

it's margaret said...

exactly, Paula. Yeppa.